HOMEPRO ANSWERS

Many professional home inspectors consider weatherization when they inspect the interiors of houses. Newer homes tend to have much tighter and better insulated building envelopes. There are a host of energy efficient upgrades available to existing homes though some of them will take a very long time in returning the investment. The unknowing do it yourself runs the risk of blocking up critical attic ventilation and even setting up fire hazards when insulating over lighting fixtures that project through the ceiling into attic floor insulation.

Up until about 1935, plaster on wood lath was the most common finish material for walls and ceilings. That plaster often weighed about as much as concrete and with the typical 1/4 inch ceiling, was prone to falling suddenly. God help any person or nice piece of furniture beneath such a fall.

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Aside from kitchen and bathroom remodeling, maintaining the interior of your home can add to its value and aesthetics. "Curb appeal" may draw attention to your house, but it's the inside of the house that we see and interacted with much more frequently. Homeowners need not spend thousands of dollars in upgrades. Simple maintenance is the first step. From there, improving the smaller things, area by area, will give an increase in value. Clean it, change it, and paint it.



 
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Mold & MIldew

This is what the wall materials look like once the bath wall tiles have been removed. It may be that moisture, and even water, has been getting behind the tiles for a long time.

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Hardwood Installation

The scene here shows a 3/4 inch tongue and groove hardwood oak floor being installed as a retrofit in an older home. The wooden flooring was delivered and stored in the house for...